drun4fun

Ideas, photos, routes, and how I fare doing all sorts of workouts. Riding, swimming, biking, etc. Dave Masterson's workout blog.

Archive for the tag “nyc marathon”

First light

5mi Daylight Standard Time is back. So running half of the workout in the daylight always has me thinking I’m late for something. I went half speed just a few days after guide running NYC Marathon with Julie. It was good to see Janet at her first track session in months – she very much enjoys running fast. There was plenty of talk about Shalane Flanigan’s big win in the marathon and Gwen Jorgensen’s desire to now focus on a marathon gold medal in the next Olympics.

1 mile warmup jog

300m w/100m recovery
600m w/200m recovery
300m w/100m recovery
700m w/200m recovery
300m w/100m recovery
400m w/200m recovery
500m w/200m recovery
300m w/100m recovery
200m w/100m recovery
500m w/200m recovery
300m w/100m recovery
400m

1 mile cool down jog

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Forcibly long

img_626520mi. I wasn’t thinking of running 20 miles today, 16 was going to be enough to do solo. I missed yesterday’s run because I was announcing at the Miami Children’s Health Foundation 5k. So today I couldn’t skip, the NY Marathon is only 6 weeks away.

I started alone at Dunkin Donuts at 5:30am. I ran down to PGA Blvd and back, spotting Aldo at the duck pond on my return trip. He said he was out to run 16 today, that was good news for me. I was already at 5+, so I would stay with him.

There weren’t many runners out this morning. There was a cycling event, Tour de Zeppole at Marcinski Rd. That had a police escort up A1-A when we ran south. I went with Aldo up to the Inlet park and south again. We increased our pace with each mile once we passed Loggerhead Park. I found it difficult to run 7:50, 7:40, 7:30.

I used new shoes, Skechers Go Run Ride 5 with my usual arch supports and stretchy tri laces, those worked very well all winter for me. I think they may be laced up too snug, I will wear them around and make loosening adjustments so they feel better during the week.

Coming out of the Inlet turnaround, Aldo said we would speed up. Our first mile was 7:20 and I was working hard to do that. We didn’t begin at that pace so we must have pushed 7 flat once past Circle K to get that as an average. I was not going to hold that pace back to the start point, I needed distance and time on my toes vs. speed today. Aldo gradually sped away from me on the flat A1-A section by Xanadu. I stopped at the turquoise rooves shower to wet my head, get more water and basically surrender to keeping up with Aldo’s pace. I ran slower down to Marcinski, then slower to Donald Ross Rd.

I decided that with 16 miles today I’d be satisfied, but when would I press into doing a long run of 20? I might want to do that today. I wasn’t thrilled with running further, my feet were sore, feeling squished in the shoes, and my energy level was low. Each mile was slow going down south again to the FPL traffic light at Seminole Club. It was also getting sunny and warmer. I came back up around the duck pond and finished with a shower at the Donald Ross beach entry. I spoke with Troy and Anita who stopped by on bikes, their IM training is almost done!

My long run adventure ended with a meetup and shared conversation with Franci at DD. Cross Country meets, her parents in their 80s, and her quest to run 2016 miles this year made for good chatter!

-dm

NYC Marathon 2013 ~ The Race

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A chilly start on Staten island


26.2 mi
. Race Day!The corrals were organized and not overcrowded, I saw plenty of bathrooms and places to eat and drink. This is NOT what I had pictured for the world’s largest marathon start. I’ve driven over the

The corrals were organized and not overcrowded, I saw plenty of bathrooms and places to eat and drink. This is NOT what I had pictured for the world’s largest marathon start. I’ve driven over the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge many times, I imagined the area in front of the toll plaza to be filled with people sitting around wrapped in blankets. Most of the setup and corrals were below the roadway level at Ft Wadsworth, off the Staten Island Expressway. I saw Dunkin Donuts hats everywhere on runner’s heads as we pulled into the bus parking zone. I had to get one of those! Knowing we had a special tent in the JDRF Charity Village, we could stay warm, use clean bathrooms and not be in a terrific rush like most people. I kept my phone off as much as possible, knowing how hard it would search for a signal in the crowded area. I wanted the power to work once I was finished!

Charlotte and I went into her corral #12, easily done and we had ample space to ourselves. A short wait of 20-30 minutes before we were up walking to the start area. I’d say we were standing and waiting 70 yards from the start line. Buses neatly lined in a row kept the waves apart, the bib colors denoting who starts on the top level and who starts on the bottom of the bridge. A few speeches from Mary Wittenberg, Mayor Bloomberg, then some guy not named “berg” and the wheelchair folks were off. Next were the elite women, then elite men. It was breezy, but we were shielded from most of the wind from the people around us. I thought that might be the case for most of the run north. (Nope!) The start cannons are very loud, and since we were so close, the sound hits like a punch to the throat. Think front row seats at a concert. We don’t take long to get up to a pace that’s around 9 min miles, with others from the corral passing us on both sides. The view from the upper level of the bridge is really impressive.
marathon start dave masterson 2013
The city, Freedom Tower, the skyline, you get to see all of it at a slow pace. I’m used to driving over the bridge and sneaking a look. This is way better! I look at the road where it meets the divider and median, and I think, “How do people on the lower level get peed on? There are no holes for drainage here?” We kept pace in a windy crossing of the bridge, watching the other corrals and bib colors fan out onto many different roads at the base of the bridge. NYC Marathon dave mastersonIt was very odd to see the NYPD helicopter hovering next to the bridge at eye level – security was well taken care of for the event.

We come down the gradual hill off the bridge and there are people streaming into Brooklyn from many different roads. Soon we’re on the BQE, some bib colors go directly on the surface streets, other packs of runners are below us on exit ramps, it’s a labyrinth of roads and runners! Our first turn is a left, off onto Brooklyn’s streets. We hide behind some buildings as we head west, but not for long. We find the beginning of 4th Ave and start running north. The wind is head-on and chilly. Charlotte’s hat is starting to be a problem, it is one of those small “fair weather” models that is guaranteed to be an issue on windy days. She fixes some of that and we make sure we have gloves on because the road ahead is surprisingly open. There are many runners, but the Wave #1 start allows for you to keep your pace as in any smaller race – I’m not weaving in and out of others. We notice many police and race officials early in the course. Every street crossing has police. Counter Terrorism units are on the median that still separates us from another different group of runners. There are many good musical distractions – bands and DJs with enthusiastic crowds. Lining the streets I see hundreds of people on each block, waving flags, high-fiving runners and yelling for their friends and family.
2013-11-02 21.30.02This is like the finish stretch of Boston or Chicago, but I’m only at mile 3! We hit the first very long hydration stop, tables lining the road with Gatorade endurance formula and water. Charlotte and I start implementing our eat and drink plans. The sky is overcast, an occasional peek of the sun, but mostly clouds. We are running into the wind. This keeps cold in our minds, fingers and arms. I was supposed to toss the green “Roswell Girls Lacrosse” hoodie at the start. We talk about when we will strip down into our real running gear – that doesn’t seem as if it’s happening soon. Charlotte is already ahead of me clothes-wise, her legs are exposed vs. me with my North Face tights. No way am I parting with this hoodie as long as it’s this windy, directly in our faces! My UnderArmour

We hit the first very long hydration stop, tables lining the road with Gatorade endurance formula and water. Charlotte and I start implementing our eat and drink plans. The sky is overcast, an occasional peek of the sun, but mostly clouds. We are running into the wind. This keeps cold in our minds, fingers and arms. I was supposed to toss the green “Roswell Girls Lacrosse” hoodie at the start. We talk about when we will strip down into our real running gear – that doesn’t seem as if it’s happening soon. Charlotte is already ahead of me clothes-wise, her legs are exposed vs. me with my North Face tights. No way am I parting with this hoodie as long as it’s this windy, directly in our faces! My UnderArmour long sleeved top is generating sweat now. Think I want to feed that sweaty top to the breezy headwind? Uh, no. Charlotte keeps her sweatshirt, too. I thought I’ll keep mine slightly longer than I needed to, maybe mile 6, 10k, that would be good enough. Charlotte adjusts her gloves and takes the hand warmer things as inserts. If we had just the 46 deg temperatures, ok, that would be good for running. This northerly wind is chilling us. We make good on-pace progress up very long 4th Ave. A few mild turns but we are heading north for awhile into the wind. If we need a restroom, there are porta-potties at every water stop, now only 1 mile apart. We talk about shedding the top layer of clothes, but still we vote no. I roll the hoodie sleeves up to feel the chill of

We make good on-pace progress up very long 4th Ave. A few mild turns but we are heading north for awhile into the wind. If we need a restroom, there are porta-potties at every water stop, now only 1 mile apart. We talk about shedding the top layer of clothes, but still we vote “no.” I roll the hoodie sleeves up to feel the chill of wind against my damp UnderArmour long sleeve shirt. No way I can take that off yet, I will freeze! We stay at or slightly above the 4hr pace leading to mile 8. This is where we think we will see Charlotte’s family, on the left side of the road. It’s neat to have something to look forward to like that on a long run. There are so many people, we discuss how we may find them. Charlotte says her mom has a Publix sign that opens and closes, and that her dad and sisters should be able to pick us out. We arrange ourselves to be on the left side of the road. Crowds are getting even thicker now, we are running right at the Williamsburg Bank Building. A big right turn now has us in a shaded area, it looks very much like parts of Chicago Marathon’s course near Wrigleyville! We are very aware of the crowd and searching for the family. No sightings. Did we miss them? Wrong side of the road? nyc12Because we are running still in our warmup clothes, did they miss us? We’ll find out in less than 3 hours…  We ran through Williamsburg, the Hasidic section. I overheard a guy behind me say, “Look at the Amish people!” One strange site was a building with two large

We ran through Williamsburg, the Hasidic section. I overheard a guy behind me say, “Look at the Amish people!” One strange site was a building with two large violins on the fascia and a big sign with Hebrew letters. I call it the Hebrew Rock Cafe, and truly that’s what it looked like! Many other runners saw it and spoke of it, but we didn’t know what it was. Great music still at every mile, I am very drawn to all the crowds, smiling kids, people cheering. A guy ahead of me with his name (Dave) on his shirt gets cheers, he is wearing earbuds so he doesn’t acknowledge them. I hear the screams and cheers for “Dave” and happily wave to the people. I have no name on my clothes, I don’t think too long as to how they know it’s me. I suck it all in and keep waving back!

Half way to Central Park’s finish line is a bridge that separates Brooklyn from Queens. I thought we were running on the BQE Kosciuszko Bridge. Wrong. There’s a much more manageable local bridge that crosses the Newton Creek that we run. This is a spot where prizes are given out for the first man and woman reaching halfway. Or they used to do that! We stopped at mile 12.5 for a restroom break – it was quick, less than 60 seconds. Then up this hill which was completely exposed to the wind. We were slower here due to the winds and the cold it brought. Now into Queens, it’s not a long run on some surface streets, under the Long Island Expressway and towards Queens Blvd. I keep thinking if I look right on Rte 25 I’ll see the White Castle I used to go to outside the city. Now there are a few of them in Manhattan! We make the big left turn onto Queens Blvd/59th St and climb up to the lower level of the Queensboro Bridge. It’s very quiet under the main roadway, we run a bit slower and we don’t get the sideways blast of

Now into Queens, it’s not a long run on some surface streets, under the Long Island Expressway and towards Queens Blvd. I keep thinking if I look right on Rte 25 I’ll see the White Castle I used to go to outside the city. Now there are a few of them in Manhattan! We make the big left turn onto Queens Blvd/59th St and climb up to the lower level of the Queensboro Bridge. It’s very quiet under the main roadway, we run a bit slower and we don’t get the sideways blast of wind I think we’d get. It’s not too cold up there, and the view of the UN building and Manhattan’s East side is cool! Runners stop to work out cramps, they stretch or just walk a bit – rather than hit the hill with a purpose. I am waiting for the big crowds on 1st Ave. I’ve heard so much about it, this should be good. The descent from the bridge is rapid, including a swirl around left turn – like a spiral staircase. We come out onto the Manhattan streets and… it’s not crazy noisy? Where is the “roar” I was told I’d hear? There are many people, just lining the streets and not really cheering as one. Maybe they get it going for the leaders and then an hour later they just watch us go by? Debunked – I was ready for stadium-like noise but didn’t get near that. We keep on the water, gel and salt pill plan and know that somewhere in the 90s we have a chance at seeing the family again, if they were able to make the switch from Brooklyn to Manhattan. This time, we get it right!

This time, we get it right! nyc13Left side, eyes open, we are easily seen by Charlotte’s sisters and we spot them from 50 yards out on the side. 

 We say “Hi” and greet everyone, it is amazing to see people you know in such a terrific crowd. 
It’s also thought provoking that they’ve gotten up early, bopped around the city, dealt with the crowds and the cold, just to see us for a few minutes. Thanks, guys!

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We are back on pace and heading, yes, north – still into the wind. The sun is out but at this point, I don’t need to drop my sweatshirt, I could finish with it, we are an hour away from the end. I will take it off before we finish so I can look like a runner with a bib for whatever pictures are taken near the end.

1st Avenue has nyc15mild rising and dipping hills. They take a mile to go up, a mile to run down. Sometimes the only way you know you’re on a hill is to look at the base of the buildings as they meet the sidewalk. We have good crowd support through upper Manhattan, Harlem and towards Bronx. I can see the Manhattan Island getting skinnier, I can look right across the East River into the Bronx over the bridges on my right. Our path across the river is straight ahead. It’s a hill, we see videographers perched up high and driving next to us in slow cars and motorcycles. I imagine they are doing footage for the folks that have paid to get a DVD of themselves through the entire race. We come down the hill of the bridge into the Bronx and what a surprise – people are energized and enthusiastic. It’s like we are the first runners they’ve seen! LOUD music blares from a big sound system as we turn a corner, classic rock ends and the theme from Rocky plays. Cheerleaders, fans and people on fire escapes yell enthusiastically for the stream of runners in their neighborhood. I wasn’t expecting this so late on the course! Good bands and more cheers made this a really good surprise for both of us. Charlotte’s hands are still cold, now she’s wearing one of her gloves, one of mine and the insert warmers. At a water stop, one of her gloves fell into a puddle. This explains her “fashionable fingerwear” in any pictures taken after mile 18. It’s only two miles or less in the Bronx, then we are on another bridge back to Manhattan. we are running another long straightaway, but this time heading south. There’s another

It’s only two miles or less in the Bronx, then we are on another bridge back to Manhattan. we are running another long straightaway, but this time heading south. There’s another Aasics runner message board – these were fun to see. aasics message board dave mastersonIf you thought it out, runners and fans could leave text messages and videos cheering on their friends. Leave a message associated by bib number and that message appears when your runner crosses a chip mat placed before the message board. We see a message that read, “Go Fatso, meet us for a beer, what is this your 8 millionth marathon?” A few  meters past the electronic sign, we run past a guy with “Fatso” on his shirt!

We check each other’s pace and talk about when we’d take the plunge and jettison the extra clothes we kept so very long into the race. I finally toss my beautiful green girl’s hoodie onto a police barrier and for the first time today, I look like a runner! A bib for photos near the finish line, color coordinated clothes, a singlet, this is what I thought I’d look like the whole race. Charlotte does the same and takes her sweatshirt off at mile 22. We are running right in the middle of the road and passing more and more people who went out too fast and are now in trouble. Our eating and drinking follows a good plan, we talk to each other at each stop – reaffirming what each of us is doing. “I’m grabbing a water and eating a salt pill,” I say. Charlotte goes to a water stop on the other side of the street, and it takes us 400m to get together again. I am looking left and right, but I almost miss her once because her outfit has changed. It has been a good day of reconnecting with each other. We see and comment on a bunch of people and things along the course. Laughs? YES! It was great to be running down the street with her again!

We are aware that we have another chance to see her family in the 90s near Central Park once more before the finish. We are running in the middle of the road, passing people who stop to cramp or walk through their final miles. Charlotte was a small bit behind me as we came up on the MoMA and big right turn into Central Park. I didn’t see her sisters on the barriers, but she did. nyc17 dave mastersonMaybe they didn’t think to equate me with black and yellow run gear after they’d just seen me in green? Charlotte is out of my view for a few seconds, then as I turn into the park, she waves and we regroup. She explains she got to see her family again, which is great! Now we are in the park for the rest of the race, there are probably less than 3 miles to go. I know I’ve heard about hills here, especially at mile 24 so I’m ready. We curve and follow roads and paved paths all leading south. I see trees and fall leaves, feel the breeze from behind us and catch the sun breaking through every so often. It is a neat sensation. Mile 24 comes, no big hill yet. I’m watching for it, now other runners that already have medals are around the barricades cheering for us, too. I roll up small grade changes, but I don’t think that there are the hills people speak of. We are among many runners, the park’s path being thinner than the avenues, it’s just more congested. Not a worry though, it’s clear run lines ahead, only those that can’t keep their pace or decide to walk in front of you need attention. I get to a curve and a water stand – ahead I see Mile 25. No hills that I’d call imposing have come. Did I do it already and not notice?

Charlotte is running stronger now, we are right next to each other striding together. A few avoidance moves to get around others or curbs in the roadway for horse carriages, but we are on a good pace. I see my watch displaying our pace and time, easy math says we will cross the finish just after 4 hours. It is cold out and I wonder to myself what I’ll feel like once I stop running and don’t have my sweatshirt. They better have those space blankets ready! We encounter a blind guided runner, two pacers tethered to him take up the horse lane, so we zip over the mini-median in the center of the road and pass them on the left. Now we see the end of the park, bigger crowds and the Plaza Hotel. We are coming to the right turn that puts us on 59th Street, where our day began in the bus line. It’s not long of a run on this section – Charlotte is in the middle of 59th, I’m on the left side slapping hands with kids and anyone who wanted some interaction with a runner. People cheer as we approach the 26 mile marker, the crowds are big again. I didn’t know we had to run all the way to Columbus Circle, we do and reach a big set of bleachers on the right side. They are filled with cheering fans and people dressed warmly waving flags. We turn for the last time, right back into the park. There are signs denoting every possible distance left – 400m, 300m 200m, 100m, 50m and now we see the finish line. It’s three chutes and we line up towards the most open on the right side. I make sure we are next to each other for the marathon photo pictures. You never know if they’re going to look good, but I can make sure we are at least in them together! Big cheers as we approach and we are through the finish line. We slow quickly because there are many people lined up for marathon finisher pictures, water and the space blankets. It’s breezy and the sun has left us.

We really don’t think we can find anyone from Charlotte’s family until we are out of the park. Wisely, we did NOT opt to bag anything, so our line to get out of the finisher area is faster. I’m getting cold, we receive a food bag and get the space blankets. Both of us make sure we have ours taped on, the wind is sending chills through many of those standing around post race. Now it’s a zombie walk down paths towards the streets on the west side. We are directed to a barricaded row along Central Park West that puts us in line for — bright orange fleece-lined ponchos. What a great score! nyc18 dave mastersonLabeled as “gifts” for not using the bag check, this amazing poncho will save me from the chill and wind now that we’ve stopped running. I am glad I won’t have to rely on the silver sandwich bag liner I’ve been wearing for the last 20 minutes of walking through the park. A few slow plods down 8th Ave and we find Charlotte’s mom Gaylen, sent by the rest of the group to meet us and bring us to Opal for the afterparty. There are orange ponchos everywhere, and this sight continues late into the evening throughout the city streets. My legs feel ok, but I’m walking slower than Charlotte and her mom who are in search of a taxi. Sun in, sun out, we meet with Charlotte’s dad and finally zip eastbound in a warm car Gaylen hailed west of Lincoln Center. We wore the ponchos the whole time in the bar – I realized only a hot shower could get the chill out of me. Wisely, I feed it cold beer (??) at Opal among friends and the Central Park Track Club’s private party. A terrific ending to a memorable day!    -dm

Post on the weekend’s NYC activities.


NYC Marathon 2013 ~ The trip

My one year wait to run through the streets of the city was over – I arranged for the flight with Sal and Suzanne to arrive early on Friday to have the day  in the city to our liking. We stashed our luggage at my place, the Atlas, a brilliant score (from my brother-in-law) for my weekend stay. How’s this for a view out my bedroom window? It had a small kitchen that I didn’t use, but very good location and a place to call home for a few nights.

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View from my apartment each night

We went to the VERY crowded Expo at the Javits center. Despite a long line for security check in and bag search, we never stopped walking, we made our way into the show quite effortlessly. Everyone got their numbers and goodie bags, then we went through the Asics booth. Great race merchandise this year, it is the final ING sponsored race before it becomes the TCA NYC Marathon next fall. I got a shirt and some things for John, and some Oakley things from the “Official Eyewear Sponsor” of the race for myself. The other suppliers were as you’d see at most marathons, shoe and clothing companies, food and nutrition. We saw we missed any opportunity to meet any of the elite athletes for pictures in supplier booths, that is usually a neat experience. We had a few hours on our feet already, so we left the show and found a local eatery in Hell’s Kitchen for a beer or two and some snacks. Then back to my apartment so Sal and Suzanne could check into the Park Central hotel. We ate at Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain, a nice place that we had no troubles being seated in, I guess we beat the after work crowd. Good food! Then we went and saw Spiderman on Broadway, an action musical (if that’s possible) with U2’s Bono and Edge having done the musical score for the show. I enjoy live entertainment, and I haven’t seen a Broadway show in a few years. Very good way to be off our feet pre-race.

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Our group together at the Expo

Saturday morning I went to the Hard Rock Cafe for the JDRF breakfast (Sal’s run charity group).  l contacted Charlotte about meeting her at the expo, knowing how crowded it was we really weren’t looking forward to all of the people and crowds again, BUT we had forgotten to get the special 2012 marathon medal and wristband they were giving out to folks that were registered for last year. We enjoyed a good breakfast, I oogled over the rock ‘n roll memorabilia as expected, then we took a cab to the expo. It was easy to meet Charlotte, she had already gotten her things but also forgot the 2012 medal. A quick visit, a few vendor booth stops and purchases and we were back out on the streets. Charlotte went to spend the day with her parents and sisters, we dropped our things at my apartment and took a subway down to Battery Park. Our plan was to see the 9/11 Memorial fountains, the Orb in the park and whatever else we wanted. We had good laughs through the day, the people, the trains, the city delivers all of that! After a good look at the fountains and new Freedom Tower, we went back to the Park Central to get sorted for dinner and meet with Francee Jefferson. She had a high school cross country meet Saturday, a late afternoon flight up from Ft Lauderdale and a hurry-up visit to the Expo for packet pickup. She came to our hotel, and we also touched base with Nicole Rattay who was staying at Park Central, too.

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Cammie sighting on Seventh Avenue!

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Dinner at Maison

Bizarre occurrences happen frequently and by now I should accept this fact. While rolling out of the hotel to find a restaurant, Sal points to a woman walking in front of us with a unique Boston marathon jacket, one that includes several finisher dates on the back of the coat. Hmm, too coincidental, I know someone that has this same type of custom embroidery on a Boston coat. I tap on the elbow and discover what I thought to be true, it is Cammie and Jeff Breen walking down 7th Avenue! There are millions of people in the city, a few thousand more just for the weekend and I find someone I know strolling out to dinner? I introduced everyone and we went to our pre-race dinner at Maison. all of the runners ordered a big piece of Atlantic Salmon, what a good race prep meal we had. Telling stories and allowing everyone to meet new friends, this was a really fun night! Maison was a good find for beer, too, Kronenbourg 1664 served at a French place, of course!

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Race morning crossing the Verrazano bridge

I walked home to my place for a good night’s sleep. Pre-race setup, what to wear, listening to the FSU-Miami football game, I was doing well. I went to bed early, but didn’t fall asleep. I wasn’t nervous about the race, didn’t think I’d oversleep nor had I drank any caffeine that day. I did sleep soundly and woke up before the alarm. Stories and reports of temps in the 30s kind of evaporated as my iPhone displayed a current temp of 52 at 4am. Going down to 46 by 8am, when we’d likely hit Staten Island for the Athlete Village waiting process. I dressed well, long North Face legs, compression socks, I moved my arch inserts to the Meb Speed shoes, that went well. I have good throw-away gear, gloves, a hat, I was ready for a cold wait outside the start. Sal’s charity team had a special bus to the start that we were able to ride, and best yet, a shielded tent in Athlete Village with food and drinks! Our bus ride went all over Manhattan finally crossing under the river at the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel. BQE to Verrazano Bridge, where we waited for 30 minutes to get across. It was great to be in a heated bus seat with a bathroom on board vs the Staten Island ferry ordeal. While waiting on the bridge, the Royal Carribean Explorer of the Seas passed under the bridge – that made for a nice good morning sight and picture!

Here are my details from the race ~ thoughts and experiences.

Upon finishing, Charlotte and I met her parents. We walked west to find a less crowded street and cab, our destination was a bar called Opal on the east side. The Central Park Track Club was meeting there after the race, Charlotte knew some of them and her uncle, a fast runner from years ago was also meeting us. That place had great atmosphere, we received a round of applause when we walked in with our bright orange ponchos and finsher medals, and that was just in the regular bar! Same thing happened when we hobbled through to the back room where CPTC was meeting. I enjoyed getting my shoes off finally, having a cold beer, talking to Charlotte’s uncle and friends and warming up. Brian, a runner that went to UCLA with Charlotte, was entertaining. He had run a 16:40 5k the day before the race. His friend that walked in a half hour after us got a 2:37 in the marathon. Brian was excited because one of his friends in the club, a man named Cassidy, beat Meb by 1 second once Meb fell off the lead and bonked. What a crew to spend time with after the run!

Once I heard Sal and Suzanne had finished, I decided to loosen up my legs and walk to their hotel. Cammie hadn’t checked in yet as finished, but they planned on having a great dinner with us at an Iron-Chef restaurant called Esca. I met Cammie and Jeff at the NYPD runner’s after party (Uh huh, another VIP drop-in!) and we waited for Sal and Suzanne to shower before I went to the room and did the same. I was thankful I thought to stash clothes in their apartment so I could change after the race. Our dinner was very good, I was glad Sal could translate the menu to me – Cammie said much of the same. If it wasn’t explained for us, we threatened to order the PB&J or meatballs on a plate! After dinner, everyone took a cab back to their hotel. I walked back to my apartment and got things organized for an early morning check-out. I connected with Hillary Hamer, referred to me by fellow pacer Andrea in Ft Lauderdale. I was supposed to meet with her some time on the weekend according to Andrea, but repeated texts found us in different places throughout the expo and race days. She had run her PR today in her first-ever visit to the city! I should have arranged to meet her after Sunday’s dinner. Her hotel was very close to our restaurant and without knowing it, we both walked home alone to our respective buildings. We planned to meet up in the morning for breakfast and a visit to the Finisher’s Merchandise tent in Central Park. I cleaned up the room, organized what I wanted to pack, wear and throw away and then tipped over on the bed. Lights out, Dave.

I met John my brother in law at 8:30 to return the room key and yap about the race. Culture, a popular coffee spot, was right next to my apartment, we sat and talked for a few minutes. I walked to the Park Central and left my luggage in Sal & Suzanne’s room, found Hillary in the lobby and went to a cafe with Sal and Hillary to have something for breakfast besides hot chocolate. We gathered Cammmie, Jeff and Suzanne and walked to Central Park.

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Cammie, Sal, Suzanne, Me, Hillary – the runners!

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With Hillary – Central Park Wolman Rink

The merch sale was a zoo, lines, a small store, this would be better accomplished online we all figured. We walked a few blocks north to see Strawberry Fields, it was Hillary’s first time there. We stopped and talked about John Lennon at the Dakota before going into the park. It wasn’t as crowded as usual, a man played Beatles songs on a guitar but no flowers or cards were on the “Imagine” tiles as I am used to seeing. Maybe we were there a bit early in the day? We walked diagonally through Central Park, took some photos and then went for lunch. That was only a short walk down to the Plaza Hotel and Todd English’s Food Court. An odd meal consisting of clam chowder, beer and cheesecake, but who’s watching the marathoner’s diets anyway? Once done, we split up and headed back to our hotels to catch planes. Cammie and Jeff drove from Boston, so they stayed a bit longer in the city. Hillary was not far behind us returning to Florida, she started flying back to Ft Lauderdale right about when we’d were landing in WPB. I felt great knowing I packed so much into my weekend away. Good food, good sights, the race and really above all, good friends. I’d run NYC again, I think it would be an interesting route to race. This time, the experiences surrounding the marathon made the trip special.              -dm

Long run with Suzanne

19mi. I ran at 5am which means at least a 16 miler. Suzanne S. is now training for the NYC marathon, so her Saturdays will be spent running long before the Amelia Island 1/2 Ironman, then maybe one after that. IT was raining hard at times, with wind and the beginnings of the hurricane/tropical storm Isaac coming to us. I need longer mileage familiarization runs too, so this is perfect for both of us. We ran with Walter and several others from the store, but Gary Walk and Erica went ahead after mile 1 on their own pace. I stopped on the way up form PGA in the bushes for a bathroom break, muffling my flashing lights from the view of passing police cars as I did. I used most of A1A to catch Walter and Suzanne before Donald Ross Road. We went back to the store, drank some and headed back out for the 10.5mi loop. We were surprised at how long it took for the sun to rise, we had reached Carlin Park almost in the dark. We spoke how this would make next month’s lulu Beach Bash a bit funny if the meditation and yoga happened in the dark! We ran and stopped briefly at the Inlet bathroom, then south down through the pier area and to Donald Ross Road. We drank there and ran with Linda to her street, then linda ran the remainder of the duck pond with us. Once linda left us, it began raining just to make us remember what we were running through when we started.

This run was good for both of us. At a controlled pace, we both felt fine in the latter miles, each having some soreness in one side on our hip area. I didn’t have any nutrition, just water and Endurox at mile 6 and upon finishing. Once back at the store, Suzanne and I had a quick meet up at DD before we went into Saturday family and fun things.

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